How to Play Roulette and Win – Roulette Tips and Strategies

Winning in a game fueled mostly by chance requires a lot of luck and a strong bankroll. On top of the two, there should be some form of common sense. A few dosage of intelligence may give a player an idea on what to do next with their roulette chips. If you’re someone who wants to play better roulette and win more than what nonsensical players do, then here are some points you may want to consider to make your roulette games more entertaining, if not profitable.

Consider the Odds

Every type of bets has their own payout and odds, the higher the payout the lesser the odds you win with your bets. It’s your job as a player to determine the odds of winning and estimate how much you are going to win or lose in the long run. Try striking a balance between the two determinants. Some people advise new player to try wagering on even-money bets as they have one of the highest expected value in the long run.

Consider the Table

The Roulette table where you play is one of the earliest determinants of the expected gain or lose of one player. While they may seem to be the same, always remember that the American roulette carries lesser odds for the player, which means the table has a higher edge compared to its European counterpart. This means a player gets to lose more in American Roulette than in European Roulette. So if you’re playing roulette to win, you might want to settle on a table that gives a little bit more odds in your favor.

Consider the Edge

Never underestimate the effect of house edge in your bankroll. House edge rates like 1.35%, 2.5%, 5.26 and 7.89% may not mean so much, but given the number of hands, it sure packs a wallop in your bankroll. You may be winning once every few hands, but you could be losing it on house as well, and worse, you can’t do anything about it. Player who doesn’t care about the house edge and its effect in their game usually finds himself empty-handed in the roulette table.

Consider En Prison and La Partage

Apart from the even-money bets, one thing you should look into is the En Prison and La Partage rules. En Prison rule allows the player to either lose half of his chips or to let his chips sit for another round when the ball hits Zero. In La Partage, the players are automatically given back half of the chips they have bet. This provides players with lesser house advantage, which means players lose a lot lesser when there is La Partage and En Prison rules in effect. These rules provides player with more advantage over the house and could help spell the difference between winning and losing money. Not all casino implements the rule, so ask first if they have En Prison or La Partage rules before you play.


Learn to Play Craps – Tips and Strategies – The Gambler’s Fallacy

Be smart, play smart, and learn how to play craps the right way!

The “gambler’s fallacy” is the false belief that fixed odds increase or decrease depending on recent occurrences. Let’s use the familiar coin-flip example to illustrate this concept. Assuming we use a fair coin and a fair flip, we expect a 50% chance that heads will appear and a 50% chance that tails will appear. Those odds are fixed and will never change. Suppose heads appears five times in a row. If you think tails has a better chance of appearing on the next flip because it hasn’t shown for the last five flips (i.e., you think tails is “due”), then you’ve fallen for the gambler’s fallacy. You must understand that results of previous flips have no influence on the outcome of future flips.

In craps, the dice have no memory. They don’t remember how they landed on the last roll. They don’t care if they haven’t shown a 7 in the last 50 rolls or even a million rolls. The odds of any number showing remain constant and are never influenced by what occurred previously.

Have you seen the big tote board by a roulette wheel showing the results of the last 10 or 15 rolls? It not only shows the recent numbers that hit, but also the colors (i.e., red or black). Almost every roulette wheel in every casino on the planet has a tote board. What purpose does that thing serve for either the player or the casino?

It doesn’t serve the player any purpose other to sucker him into making a bet that he wouldn’t otherwise make. It serves the casino’s ultimate purpose of taking advantage of the gambler’s fallacy and getting more bets in play. The more bets in play, the more money the casino makes. The casino has one key goal: get you to make as many bets as possible. The casino knows its profits go up as your number of bets goes up. The sole purpose of the tote board is to get you to make a bet that you normally wouldn’t make.

Suppose a husband and wife stroll through the casino on their way to dinner with no intention of stopping to gamble. They approach the table-games area and see on a particular roulette wheel’s tote board that the color red appeared on the last six rolls. The guy points to the wheel and says, “Look, dear, black is due for that wheel. Let’s try it!” The tote board just did its job. It suckered the guy into making a bet that he wouldn’t have made had he not known that red appeared six times in a row. Yeah, sure, black is “due” all right. Wrong! The little ball doesn’t know it landed on red the last six times. It only knows that both red and black have an equal chance of appearing on the next roll. It doesn’t influence itself to land on any particular number or color because of past occurrences.

Suppose your craps system tells you to Lay the 4 for $50 only after the number 4 hits three times in a row. Your system is based on the belief, if the number 4 shows three times in a row, then chances are that a 7 will appear before another 4. Is this a good, smart bet? Is this simple system good or bad?

Yes, it’s definitely a good bet, and this system is an acceptable way to play if you don’t mind getting bored to death. You think, “Huh? You’re either nuts or full of crap because you just finished saying the dice have no memory, and future outcomes aren’t influenced by previous ones. Therefore, how can that be a good, smart bet?” Calm down, let me explain.

In this example, you make a bet only after the number 4 has appeared three times in a row. You’re a knowledgeable player, a disciplined rock, one who sticks to your system and doesn’t allow emotion to cause you to deviate. Making a Lay 4 bet under those specific conditions doesn’t make your odds of winning or losing any different than another person making a Lay 4 bet at any other random time. Regardless of when or under what circumstances you make the bet, the odds don’t change. The Lay 4 bet with a vig after a win always has a 1.64% house advantage. It doesn’t matter whether you make the bet only after the number 4 has appeared three times in a row, or only when the shooter takes a swig of beer, or only when there’s a full moon. The odds never change.

However, although the Lay 4 bet with a vig after a win is considered a good bet because of its low house advantage, it’s possible to regard it as bad under certain circumstances. Let’s look at another example.

Suppose your system doesn’t include the Lay 4 bet. Under no circumstances does it tell you to make a Lay 4 bet. Suppose the number 4 appears eight times in a row. The hot babe next to you falling out of her halter top says, “There’s no way a four will hit again. We should bet against it. What do you think?” You respond, “No thanks, I’ll stick to my system. It’s been good to me so far.” She wiggles a bit and says, “Oh, come on, I don’t want to be the only one hoping for a seven.” Her jiggling causes you to lose focus, so you say, “Maybe you’re right. Another four can’t possibly hit again. Let’s go for it!”

This is a situation where a good bet can be a bad thing. The key is that you allowed yourself to risk more money than you had originally planned because of the gambler’s fallacy (and partly because you couldn’t say no to the bimbo next to you). Remember, the more bets you make, the more the casino wins. So, adding more bets to your plan–even though they may be considered good because of their low house advantages–can be hazardous to your bankroll.

Let’s revisit the example of the couple strolling through the casino. Suppose the couple were in their hotel room before going down to dinner. As the guy brushes his hair, he says to his wife, “Is it okay if we stop at the roulette wheel so I can make a quick five-dollar bet?” His wife responds, “Sure, but we have reservations and we can’t be late.” They stroll through the casino and approach the roulette wheel. The guy sees that red has appeared six times in a row and, as a result, decides to bet $5 on black (he thinks black is “due”).

Under these circumstances, using the tote board to influence his bet is harmless. Regardless of what bet he makes (black, red, even, odd, etc.), the house still has about a 5% advantage. The guy came to the table intending to make a $5 bet, so the results displayed on the tote board weren’t the trigger that influenced his decision to make the bet. In this example, although the guy’s belief in the gambler’s fallacy influenced him to bet on black, the gambler’s fallacy didn’t trigger him into making the bet (he had already intended to make the bet before leaving his hotel room). The gambler’s fallacy does its job only when it influences you to make a bet that you normally wouldn’t make.

The moral is, don’t let the gambler’s fallacy cause you to make bets that you normally wouldn’t. If you still believe that previous results influence future results and–here’s the important part–if this belief causes you to risk more money than you intended, then you’re playing a dangerous game. Play smart. Be a rock. Don’t fall for the gambler’s fallacy. Don’t let it cause you to put more money at risk than you had planned or that you can afford to lose. If you don’t want to lose your shirt, you must learn the secret to craps. Don’t fall for bogus winning systems or ridiculous dice-setting claims. Be smart. Play smart. Learn how to play craps the right way.

Now you know!


Learn to Play Craps – Tips and Strategies – Craps Terms (Part 2)

In this article, we continue our lesson on learning craps terms. The following terms cover the letters C to D in alphabetical order. Craps terms beginning with other letters are defined in my other articles.

C And E (C&E) = Craps and Eleven. A bet that the next roll will be a 2, 3, 12, or 11.

Cage = The cashier. Where you exchange cheques for cash after you leave a game.

Capped Dice = Crooked dice.

Casino Odds = The payoff odds that the casino pays when a player wins. Less than true odds; thereby, creating a house advantage.

Change Only = What the dealer or player says when cash is dropped on the table as a buy-in.

Charting = A player keeping track of roll results using either paper and pencil or the player’s cheques.

Cheques = Chips with a denomination printed on them.

Chips = Chips without a denomination printed on them.

Choppy = When the table goes back and forth from making a point to a 7-out.

Cold Table = When shooters aren’t making points.

Color In, Color Coming In = From the casino’s viewpoint, when a player exchanges low-denomination cheques for high-denomination cheques. Typically just before a player leaves the game so the casino knows how much was won or lost, or so the player doesn’t have to carry a lot of low-denomination chips to the cage.

Color Out, Color Going Out = From the player’s viewpoint, when a player exchanges low-denomination cheques for high-denomination cheques. Typically just before a player leaves the game so the casino knows how much was won or lost, or so the player doesn’t have to carry a lot of low-denomination chips to the cage.

Come = A bet that’s the same as a Pass Line bet except made after a point is established.

Come-out Roll = The first roll of a new game.

Comp = Short for complimentary. Free stuff the casino gives the players for their gambling action (e.g., drinks, show tickets, food vouchers, room discounts).

Crap Out = Rolling a 2, 3, or 12 on the come-out roll.

Crapless Craps = A rare layout variant where all numbers, except 7, can be rolled as the point. If a 2, 3, 12, or 11 is rolled on the come-out, it becomes the point.

Craps = The numbers 2, 3, 12.

Craps Is A Game Of Skill Not Strength = What the stickman might say if the shooter throws the dice too hard.

Dead = No players at a table.

Dealer = The person responsible for all bets on his side of the table.

Decision = A roll that ends the game. If a natural is rolled on the come-out, an immediate decision is made. After a point is established, a decision is made by rolling either the point number again or a 7.

Dice Are In The Middle = When the stickman moves the dice to the center of the table after each roll. This is when players should make their bets.

Die In The Wood, Roll No Good = What the stickman might say when a die bounces and lands in the wooden chip rack on the rail.

Dime = Two $5 cheques.

Don’t Come = A bet the same as a Don’t Pass bet except made after a point is established.

Don’t Pass = A bet that the shooter will not make the point.

Double Odds = A free odds or true odds bet that is twice as large as the Flat Pass Line or Flat Don’t Pass bet.

Down Behind = What the dealer says when a Don’t bet loses.


Learn to Play Craps – Tips and Strategies: Want Proof Dice Control is a Scam?

Be smart, play smart, and learn how to play craps the right way!

Is it legitimate or a scam? Let’s take a look. I suspect that the notion of dice control is a big-money industry (perhaps, multi-million dollars annually). You name it and they sell it: books, tapes, seminars, full-size practice craps tables, half-size tables (a.k.a. throwing stations), toss bars, dice, and practice grippers. But is it real or just an elaborate hoax to swindle you out of your hard-earned money? The answer seems so obvious. Sadly, the world will never be without plenty of people so blinded by their burning desire to win big that they can’t or won’t stop long enough to think twice before handing over their money.

If you’ve read my other articles and Ebook, you know my thoughts on the world of dice control, dice setting, precision shooting, or whatever else you want to call it. In my opinion, it’s a silly world called Fantasyland. I won’t regurgitate my other works so let’s get to the point of this article. You want proof that dice control is a scam to rip you off? Consider one simple question and its answer. Take a deep breath and try to relax your overwhelming desire to get rich off the casino. Now, ask yourself, “Do you think that the casino would allow truly skilled dice setters to play with an advantage over the house, no matter how slight?” Be honest with your answer.

Again, “Do you think that the casino would allow truly skilled dice setters to play with an advantage over the house, no matter how slight?” Of course not. The casino has the right to deny service to any player for any reason, whether you’re too drunk, too obnoxious, too lucky, too skilled, or too anything. If they don’t want you playing for any reason, they can tell you to leave and there’s nothing you, the law, or anyone can do about it. Consider blackjack card counters. Card counting is entirely legal, but if the casino thinks a player is card counting (and, thus, has a small advantage over the house), it immediately removes him from the game. The casino never accepts a player advantage. The casino always has the advantage–always. Same with craps. If the casino believes a player has an advantage over the house by means of controlling the dice, it removes him from the game. The bottom line is that when the dice hit the back wall, no one knows how they’ll bounce off those rubber pyramids. That’s why casinos allow dice setters to use their wacky tossing routines.

Again, “Do you think that the casino would allow truly skilled dice setters to play with an advantage over the house, no matter how slight?” I’ve never heard of any of the so-called dice doctors, dice wizards, or famous multi-book dice-control authors getting thrown out of a casino because of their dice-tossing skills. Have you? According to their websites and written works, they routinely play in casinos across the globe allegedly beating the crap out of the casino. So, ask yourself again, “Do you think that the casino would allow truly skilled dice setters to play with an advantage over the house, no matter how slight?”

Casinos have been around for a long time. They’re big business. Consider the multi-billion dollar resorts in Vegas (yes, that’s “billion” with a “b”). Do you honestly think they haven’t thoroughly examined the legitimacy of dice control? A player advantage smacks those mega-businesses right where it hurts–in their wallets. Do you honestly think the casinos would tolerate and allow a player to play with an advantage over the house? The answer is obvious to me. Is it obvious to you? Put yourself in the casinos’ shoes. If you have the right to deny service to anyone for any reason, why would you allow anyone to play with an advantage over you, especially at a craps table? I doubt that you would.

If you agree that casinos do allow dice-control specialists to play, and if you agree that casinos don’t allow players to play with an advantage over the house, then what does that tell you about all the books, articles, websites, newsletters, and magazines that claim you can beat the crap out of the casino by using dice control? I don’t see how the answer could be any more obvious or simple. Casinos allow dice setters to play; casinos don’t allow a player to play with an advantage over the house; therefore, it stands to reason that the casino doesn’t believe the dice setter can gain an advantage over the house. It’s that simple. You wanted proof that dice control is a scam? That sounds like awfully convincing proof to me, how about you? If it’s true that the casino doesn’t believe the dice setter can gain an advantage over the house, then why should you believe it?

If you still don’t see the light, it’s probably because you’re desperately clinging to your blazing desire to beat the crap out of the casino. You want so badly the idea of dice control to be legitimate that you can taste it. You think, “Regardless of what you say, I saw a guy last night set the dice and he rolled point after point. It worked for him, so how can you say it doesn’t work?” Simple. It was his turn to get lucky at that particular instant in time. Everyone has good times, mediocre times, and bad times. Even the dice setter gets lucky occasionally. The question is whether the dice setter is consistently a winner. He’s not. His hot streak turns cold, just as it does for everyone. Minutes after his hot roll, the dice setter again goes through his wacky motions, but this time he immediately rolls a losing 7-out. As we learned in my other articles, it’s not the player’s dice-shooting skill or the player’s betting system that makes him a winner, it’s the distribution variance. The game is designed for the player to lose, so the player’s only hope for winning lies with the phenomenon called variance. Nothing more, nothing less. (Read my other article titled, Variance.)

One more time, “Do you think that the casino would allow truly skilled dice setters to play with an advantage over the house, no matter how slight?” Rationally think about that question and its answer, and then decide for yourself if the notion of dice control is a scam. If the casino doesn’t believe dice setters can gain an advantage over the house, then why should you believe it?

For a detailed explanation of why I believe dice control is pure nonsense, please visit my website and read the free sample chapter on dice setting from my new Ebook.

Now you know! Remember, learn how to play craps the right way.